Tulumba Tatlisi – Fluted Fritters In Syrup

While we were in Kahramanmaras, we went on a day trip to a place called “Icme” which literally means “drinking / to drink”.  No no, it’s not a bars street, there is a spring resort in “Icme”. People travel to the place from all over South Eastern Anatolia and the Mediterranean region just to drink and possibly take back home as much mineral water as they can to restore or  preserve their health.

The mineral water in Icme is quite bitter and not very pleasant to drink. Locals came up with a solution to this. Just next to the main spring, there are dozens of stalls selling sweets, especially in-syrup types, providing the visitors with a chance to get as thirsty as possible. They serve generous  amounts of sweets followed by bottles of mineral water, fresh from the springs. So if you survive the glucose coma,  you’ll have drunk lots of water from the fountain of health. Yeah, I am all for healthy living, so give me more of that dessert!

I took pictures of the famous Turkish dessert served there: Tulumba which literally means “pump”. It’s easy to make at home and is its best when fresh and warm. Make sure it’s crispy outside and soft and fluffy inside.

Ingredients

Dough:

2 cups (400 ml) water
3 tablespoons of (45 g) butter
A pinch of salt
1 1/2 cup flour
3 eggs

2 cups sunflower oil for deep frying

Syrup:

6 cups of sugar
4 cups of water
1 teaspoon of lemon juice

Boil water and sugar in a 2-3 lt pot for 10-15 minutes. When boils, add in the lemon juice. Let it cool off.

Heat the water, butter and salt in another saucepan. Bring to boil, lower the heat and add in the flour. Stir vigorously until the mixture separates from the sides of the pot and becomes doughy. Remove from the heat and put aside for a few minutes. Add in all the eggs one at a time, making sure each egg is well blended before adding the next.

Heat the oil in a large cooking pot on low heat. Fill in your pastry bag with the dough. Bring the heat on medium-high. Squeeze out pieces resembling pretzels but without the extra back-twist, preferably hand-size bow-shaped pieces. Fry each piece uniformly on medium-high heat. Remove your fried tulumba with a slotted spoon and place them on a paper towel to rid the excess oil.


Throw in all the fried tulumba into the cold syrup in large pot. The trick is the syrup must be icy cold and the fried dough pieces must be hot. Leave them in syrup for about 10 minutes and stir occasionally. Make sure they soak up the syrup well.

Use a slotted spoon to remove the pieces from the syrup. Place on a large serving plate and serve while warm and crispy.

 

About these ads

The URI to TrackBack this entry is: http://ottomancuisine.com/2010/08/27/tulumba-tatlisi-fluted-fritters-in-syrup/trackback/

RSS feed for comments on this post.

4 CommentsLeave a comment

  1. May I just say, kudos on a wonderful blog! Everything looks delicious :]

    • Thanks a lot for your nice comment, much appreciated. The blog is still a baby, but I am working on it. There is a lot more to come.

  2. Bnsoir ; Je vous remercie pour votre recette mais il y a un gros mais , ce n’est vraiment pas très bon …. Je suis d’origine turc de Kahramanmaras et je n’est jamais manger de TATLI aussi mauvais et pourtant je suis très bonne cuisinière !

    • Hi Sidika. Thanks for dropping by. I’d appreciate if you, as an expert, could point out what exactly is “wrong” with my recipe. Sure there may be better recipes out there but I don’t think this one is as horrible as you claimed. I suspect some things might get lost in translation and you misunderstood the recipe, assuming you don’t speak English.


Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 104 other followers

%d bloggers like this: